Wednesday

Michaelmas...


Michaelmas, or the Feast of Michael and All Angels,
is celebrated on the 29th of September every year.
As it falls near the equinox, the day is associated with
the beginning of autumn and the shortening of days
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St Michael is one of the principal angelic warriors,
protector against the dark of the night and the
Archangel who fought against Satan and his evil
angels. As Michaelmas is the time that the darker
nights and colder days begin - the edge into winter -
the celebration of Michaelmas is associated with
encouraging protection during these dark months

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Michaelmas Day - 'Shooting the Moon', 1836
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September 29th - or Old Michaelmas Day/October 10th
(..and May 1st) - was 'skiftedag' - ' Moving Day'
Hmmm, some had to move by night...


Michaelmas Day.
John Leech sketch from Punch, 1847
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Michaelmas was 'a goose day' in the older days,
remember this?


Postcard of St. Michael by Marie-Laure Viriot
Purchase here


Saint Michael; stained glass in the Pfarrkirche
in Linz am Rhein (Germany) 20th cent
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by R. de Cramer
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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear Apusiath,
You've mixed two things:
St Michael, who is archangel and beating with satan (as a dragon),
and St Martin (11 XI), who was legionist and gave his half of overcoat (11 XI is a goose day, I think).
With my best wishes
Joanna

Aputsiaq said...

Ooooh, I have posted some St. Martin Ostheimer wooden dolls...silly me...oh, dear you're right!

But goose day was at the old Michaelsmas (‘Michaelmas goose’. Traditional meal for the day includes goose (a "stubble-goose", i.e. one prepared around harvest time) at Michaelmas Gander You can read more here: http://www.wilsonsalmanac.com/michaelmas.html

or

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/seasonal-food-and-drink/8030658/Goose-Well-worth-a-gander.html

Anonymous said...

Thanks, in Poland I think goose day was at st Martin's, but it may be local. A lot of thanks for your blog anyway - is marwelous!
happy days for you!
Joanna

Aputsiaq said...

Hi again Joanna...oh, we have goose at st Martin's too! I think the Michaelmas Goose goes back to the old traditions when Michaelmas was in October...and when it changed into September the 'goose traditions' did the same...BUT I'm no expert...I'm only guessing ;O)